Simple Kick Set

Ryan Woodruff
 

SCY

The top interval here had Streamline Sticks in at 10 yards, the B interval at 7 yards, and the C interval at 5 yards.

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The Pyramid of Pain

Ryan Woodruff
 

This set provides some incentives for fast swimming.  The picture below explains the process of the Pyramid.  All swimmers begin with a 200 for time with the goal of being within 6 seconds of lifetime best (girls) or 8 seconds (boys).  100 easy for all, and then those that failed will do a broken 200 (75-50-50-25 @:10 rest) while those that succeeded in reaching the goal will do a broken 100 (50-50@:10rest).  The goal on the broken 200 is a lifetime best.  The goal on the broken 100 is within 2 seconds of lifetime best.  The second swim is followed by another 100 easy, and based on a swimmer’s success or failure he then completes either a broken 200 (75-50-50-25@:20 rest), a broken   100 (50-50@:10 rest), or an all-out dive 50.  The goals are a lifetime best, a best +3 or faster, and the starting 50 split for a lifetime best 100, respectively.  Success or failure on the 3rd swim leads to 10 push-ups or a “Hooray!”

We performed two rounds and saw many season-best practice swims.
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@CSCSwimcoach ‘s 150s Set

Chris Plumb
 
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Editor’s Note: This set was previously published here at The Swimming Wizard. It uses Streamline Sticks at a distance of about 5 yards.

2 x 7 x 150

The 150 is always on a total of 2:00

#1: 50 on :30 100 on 1:30
#2: 50 on :35 100 on 1:25
#3: 50 on :40 100 on 1:20
#4: 50 on :45 100 on 1:15
#5: 50 on :50 100 on 1:10
#6: 50 on :55 100 on 1:05
#7: 50 on :60 100 on 1:00
Rest :60
For the second round, go backwards through set, starting with 100 on 1:00 etc.

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Dolphin Kicking and Race Pace Set

Ryan Woodruff

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Lane 1 – no streamline sticks
Lane 2 – sticks at 5yd from each wall
Lane 3 – sticks at 6yd from each wall
Lane 4 – sticks at 8yd from each wall
Lane 5 – sticks at 10yd from each wall
Lane 6 – sticks at 12.5yd from each wall

We performed the following set:

60 x 50 @ 1:00 (2 sets of 30)
#1-6: Smooth swim
#7-12: descend 1-3 and 4-6
#13-18: 25 fast/25 ez
#19 – 24: 25 ez/25 fast
#25-30: at P200 (Goal 200 pace)

In each set of 6, each athlete will do #1, in lane 1, #2 in lane 2 and so on. By using the Streamline Sticks, you control the distance UW. Makes for a significant challenge on the 5th and 6th 50 of each set. Additionally, this set can be used as an experiment to test an athletes capability to swim at P200 while kicking increasing distances. Most athletes can make it while kicking further than they do habitually.

Double Underwater 50s for short course kicking power

Ryan Woodruff
 
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Use Streamline Sticks at 7yd distance from each wall. Put two at each location, effectively blocking off the entire lane. Swimmers have to kick out 7yd off the wall, swim 11yd, and then kick the final 7 yd underwater, do an open turn and do it again! Feel free to change up the underwater distance for a more or less challenging set.

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How to Build Your Own Streamline Sticks (and dominate your competition underwater)

Ryan Woodruff
 

 Last week, I wrote a post about Streamline Sticks, one tool I use to help my swimmers develop faster underwater dolphin kicking skills.  Naively, I thought I might make a few for 2 or 3 readers who were interested.  Instead, I was overwhelmed with responses from coaches and swimmers who wanted to get their hands on one.

Click here to find out more about how you can build your own Streamline Sticks.

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Streamline Sticks

Ryan Woodruff
 
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Streamline Sticks are easily among the best pieces of training equipment I have seen in my 13 years of club coaching.  We use them weekly to develop the habits and skills to produce consistent underwater dolphin kicking.  They force swimmers to kick a set distance off the wall and allow for circle swimming within the lane.  Send me an email at swimmingwizard@gmail.com or just leave your e-mail in the comments below if you are interested in getting your hands on a Streamline Stick and maybe I’ll make a few for Swimming Wizard readers.

UPDATE: The Swimming Wizard has been overwhelmed with responses about these streamline sticks.  I am planning to post a video soon that explains how they may be constructed.  Thanks! – Ryan

Double UW 50s

Ryan Woodruff, North Carolina Aquatic Club
coachryan@ncacswim.org

LCM
Use Streamline Sticks at 10m distance from each wall. Put two at each location, effectively blocking off the entire lane. Swimmers have to kick out 10m off the wall, swim 30m, and then kick the final 10m underwater. Do an open turn and do it again! Feel free to change up the underwater distance for a more or less challenging set.

Carmel Combos

Chris Plumb, Carmel Swim Club
chris@carmelswimclub.com

Here is a set we did this morning with kick-out bouys in past the flags

2 x 7 x 150

The 150 is always on a total of 2:00

#1: 50 on :30 100 on 1:30

#2: 50 on :35 100 on 1:25

#3: 50 on :40 100 on 1:20

#4: 50 on :45 100 on 1:15

#5: 50 on :50 100 on 1:10

#6: 50 on :55 100 on 1:05

#7: 50 on :60 100 on 1:00

Rest :60

For the second round, go backwards through set, starting with 100 on 1:00 etc.

 

Related Posts:
Yota Kick-Out Sticks
More Kick-out sticks
Twenty Ways to Do 20 x 25 #14
Streamline Sticks Progression

YOTA Kick-Out Sticks

Note: These “Kick-out Sticks” or “Streamline Sticks” have been a topic of discussion since Streamline Sticks was published. Coach Onken has the best design we’ve seen so far presented below.

Chad Onken, YMCA of the Triangle Area (YOTA)

Picture #1 – pic of the end of the PVC pipe, with the male end super glued onto the edge of the PVC pipe. A divot was drilled into the male end to allow a slit where the lane rope cord will be.

Picture #2 – pic of the female end (male/female part is bought together)

Picture #3 – the three components of the kick-out stick: the PVC insulation (black), the female piece which is threaded to fit the male piece that is super glued to the top of the PVC pipe.

Picture #4 – picture of the female/male pieces screwed on together (with PVC insulation around the rest of the PVC pipe

Picture #5 – the final product at work (very close to the wall).

What makes this (soon to be patented – hahaha) product so great is that it allows for two way swimming in and out of walls and it is also completely moveable to different differences from the wall. You can make it as easy/challenging as you want it. The sticks are designed to take a beating, we have a few kids that consistently run into them all the time. And the best part is that they are very cheap – we were able to buy the supplies needed for a 6 lane pool for around $16.





Twenty Ways to Do 20 x 25 – #14

Ryan Woodruff, North Carolina Aquatic Club
coachryan@ncacswim.org

#14 – Fun with Streamline Sticks

You’ll need four lanes to do this. Position one set of Streamline Sticks in each lane in such a way that the swimmers swim a “snake” pattern – down the pool in lane 1, back in lane 2, down in lane 3, back in lane 4.

Lane 1 – Streamline Sticks at 5 yds
Lane 2 – Streamline Sticks at near 15 m mark (about 7.5 yards from the wall)
Lane 3 – Streamline Sticks at 12.5 yards
Lane 4 – Streamline Sticks at 15 m

20 x 25 @ :30
Do freestyle, backstroke, or freestyle in groups of 4 x 25 at a time. Descend 1-4.
#1 – in lane 1
#2 – in lane 2
#3 – in lane 3
#4 – all out fast in lane 4

After #4, take an additional 30 seconds rest to migrate back to Lane 1.